RedSeal expert on the IoT headache and how to bolster defences

Intelligent CISO | June 14, 2019

Debunk 10 common public cloud myths

Search Cloud Computing | June 21, 2019

ZDNet: A cybersecurity labor shortage

ZDNet | June 19, 2019

Digital Resilience: What You Can Do – Now

Tau Beta Pi – The Bent | June 18, 2019 (Page 14)

Podcast: How network modeling helps operations and security teams mitigate risk

CyberScoop Radio | June 17, 2019

Digital Trends Live with Ray Rothrock

Digital Trends Live | June 10, 2019

Security Leadership: Women in the Spotlight

Security Magazine | June 5, 2019

Why It’s Time to Prepare for AI Wielding Hackers

Data Center Knowledge | June 4, 2019

“Healthy networks are large, and will grow and change rapidly,” said Mike Lloyd, CTO at the security firm RedSeal. “Human effort won’t scale – there are too many threats, too many changes, and too many network interactions.”

Cyber Canon Book Review: Digital Resilience

Palo Alto Networks | May 15, 2019

Digital Resilience: Is Your Company Ready for the Next Cyber Threat? by Ray Rothrock, Book Reviewed by Ron Gula, President Gula Tech Adventures & Co-Founder Tenable Network Security

I recommend “Digital Resilience: Is Your Company Ready for the Next Cyber Threat” to smart people who need to rapidly learn the history and issues of cybersecurity, so they can make effective decisions and formulate strategies to manage cybersecurity today.

If you’ve recently been put in charge of IT or IT operations and didn’t grow up in cybersecurity over the past 20 years, this book is for you. This book is also equally useful for new CEOs, CFOs or board members who need to understand cyber risk without getting overwhelmed with IT technology or the defeatism of “hackers and nation states will always get in, so why bother”.

Security in a Time of IoT

Industrial IoT News | May 15, 2019

By RedSeal CTO Dr. Mike Lloyd

The Internet of Things (IoT), made up of special-purpose devices designed to do a particular job well, presents a significant problem for security professionals. Several of their traditional approaches to security won’t work. Fortunately, it’s not all doom and gloom. We can use a three-step strategy for dealing with security and IoT.

First, we need to understand the nature of the IoT problem. Second, we need to invest effort in finding IoT endpoints and enumerating their weaknesses. And third, having found them, we need to look at them in the context of our own organization, our network, and our risk tolerance, so that we can clearly identify appropriate controls.